September 16, 2020

NJ Office Of Innovation And Kofile Build Open Source Website

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Posted by GovOS Team

Trenton, NJ, September 17, 2020—The New Jersey (NJ) Office of Innovation, in partnership with Kofile, the leading provider of online forms and eSignatures for government agencies,  today announced the successful launch of Business.NJ.Gov. As part of the launch, the two parties have made this an open source project, making it possible for anyone to access and use the site’s code base for their own project.

In a Medium article about the project, Joe DeLaTorre and E.J. Kalafarski—Innovation Fellows with the New Jersey State Office of Innovation—said, “In the beginning of 2020, we partnered with SeamlessDocs (now Kofile) — whose platform powers online services for a number of municipalities throughout New Jersey—to adapt the design to a new content management system…The new Business.NJ.gov is modern and mobile-friendly, and our content management platform allows the team to easily make design and content changes hour-by-hour and minute-by-minute. But perhaps the site’s most important feature is the fact that it will constantly be changing, driven by ongoing user research and feedback from business owners.”

Business.NJ.gov’s task-oriented information architecture helps guide users through processes in an intuitive manner.

“Open source” means that the source code—the lines of code that make a program run, or determine how a website loads—is available to anyone to view, copy, alter or share it. By making code available to the public, other programmers can study and learn from it. Making source code available for sharing and re-use also helps reduce duplicative software purchases within the state, and promotes collaboration and innovation and collaboration across NJ agencies. 

Kofile adapted the New Jersey Business Portal from open source code made available by the Cities of San Francisco and Los Angeles, and their technology partners, Tomorrow Partners and CivicActions. This new iteration, which is hosted on Webflow, is now available to the public. Any citizen or municipality can download the source code and create a website with similar layout and functionality. 

“We worked closely with E.J. and his team to build a clean, modern website that’s easy to use and loaded with helpful information,” said Jonathon Ende, CEO and co-founder of SeamlessDocs (now Kofile). “The Office of Innovation does so much for the state of New Jersey to advance the adoption of new technologies. So in that spirit, we decided to make this an open source project, so innovators across the state and country can learn from what we’ve built, use it for their own projects and hopefully propose ways to improve. An open source project will continue to grow and develop on the shoulders of all who use it, and we’re excited to see the next iteration of our work here.”

To access the open source code, go to https://github.com/newjersey/open-business-portal

For more information about the NJ Office of Innovation, visit https://business.nj.gov/

For more information about Kofile online forms and eSignatures, visit Kofile.com

About Kofile

About Kofile Kofile transforms the way people experience local government, with market-leading services and digital solutions that modernize operations and improve citizen access and engagement. As the foremost expert in document preservation, digitization, and indexing, Kofile makes government records accessible, with 225+ million documents digitally stored and secured. Kofile’s digital solutions are also cloud-enabled, delivering secure, reliable and scalable access to information and services through a comprehensive suite of applications for searching and requesting records, recording and e-filing, permitting and licensing, and workforce and vendor management. Kofile is a partner to hundreds of local governments, with headquarters in Dallas, Texas and strategically located laboratories in six other US locations.